Abstract

Will Our Health Come from Our Oceans The 21st Century?

Our modern Westernized welfare diet is clearly out of synch with the nutritional elements or body requires. In this series “Towards a Seaweed based Economy”, we have outlined in a previous [editorial in this Journal] for macro-nutritional elements the consequences of obesity and its “burden” of Chronic Degenerative Welfare Diseases (CDs). In this manuscript we demonstrate for mainly the Krebs’ and Oxidative Phosphorylation the required micro-elements (vitamins & minerals) for a proper mitochondrial functioning. Mitochondrial disruption, lipid peroxidation & release of inflammatory cytokines are considered the major causative mechanism for our modern welfare diseases (mainly Type-2 diabetes, DM2 and Cardiovascular Diseases, CVDs). In order to strengthen our perception that unhealthy nutrition is the major cause for the pandemics of obesity and its “burden” of CDs we enlist extensively for some very familiar food products from societal well known global operating “fast-food” companies the almost nearly lack of vitamins and minerals in our daily eaten stuff like hamburgers, whoppers, fried chicken, pizza’s and convenience meals. Furthermore we discuss the nutraceutical composition of a Paleolithic containing all the essential vitamins and minerals for our 2 million years “metabolic machinery” and quote several clinical “human” studies were it is demonstrated that the Paleolithic diet works. Finally, we discuss for a by Integrated MultiTrophic Aquaculture (IMTA) produced “substitute” oceanic Paleolithic diet its health promoting benefits with emphasis on the vitamin & mineral rich seaweeds.


Author(s):

Vincent Van Ginneken*, Evert de Vries



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